The theme of individuality in the road not taken a poem by robert frost

I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: This poem is about the road taken, to be sure, as well the road not taken, not necessarily the road less traveled. Critics of this poem are likely always to argue whether it is an affirmation of the crucial nature of the choices people must make on the road of life or a gentle satire on the sort of temperament that always insists on struggling with such choices.

This sets the mood of indecision that characterizes the language of the poem. So, again, the roads are equalized.

I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. The traveler must go one way, or the other.

Analysis of Poem

A nonconformist chooses the path less taken, which in its way makes his decisions about actions quite dependent on the choices others make Shott. The theme is that people would like to avoid decisions. On reflection, however, taking the road "because it was grassy and wanted wear" has made all the difference, all the difference in the world.

Other poetic devices include the rhythm in which he wrote the poem, but these aspects are covered in the section on structure. Frost liked to tease and goad. The poem makes us think about choice we must make in life. One of the attractions of the poem is its archetypal dilemma, one that we instantly recognize because each of us encounters it innumerable times, both literally and figuratively.

As for color, Frost describes the forest as a "yellow wood.

Robert Frost’s ‘The Road Not Taken’: Theme & Analysis

Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. Other poetic devices include the rhythm in which he wrote the poem, but these aspects are covered in the section on structure.

Whichever path he chooses, he has no way of knowing where he is going to end up.

What Gives Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” Its Power?

The famous interpretation of this poem is that Robert Frost is referring to his main character as one who makes a decision to go against the norm of society, in other words, to be an individual.

The second road is described as "just as fair," though it was "grassy and wanted wear. The less traveled path provides a chance for the mind to be stimulated. The poem shows how difficult it is to make a choice: It is normal to wonder what the outcome would have been if the other road, the road not taken, was the road chosen.

Creativity is defined as engaging the imagination to arrive at original ideas and solutions. You take the high road, I'll take the low road.

Robert Frost by Doris Ulmann, platinum print, Robert Frost- Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black.

Identical forks, in particular, symbolize for us the nexus of free will and fate: It is the hallmark of the true poet to take such everyday realities, in this case, the sighs of a friend on a country walk, and transform them into something so much more.

Any person who has made a decisive choice will agree that it is human nature to contemplate the "What if Then, the poet reaches a fork in the road. Frost also mentions the color black in the lines: Yet, as if to confuse the reader, Frost writes in the final stanza: We are free to choose, but we do not really know beforehand what we are choosing between.

But to contemplate this hypothetical deeply is folly, for it is impossible to say whether taking the other road would have been better or worse: At the moment of decision-making, both roads present themselves equally, thus the choice of which to go down is, essentially, a toss up—a game of chance.

At the same time, he realises that it is not easy to decide which path is better.

The Road Not Taken

A small courageous step makes a big difference. Robert Frost writes about a theme of individualism, and it comes down to being able to choose between the two roads, which seems to be an indecisive conclusion. It seems to be a characteristic of Robert Frost to express doubt while making revolutionary decisions.

Yet, as if to confuse the reader, Frost writes in the final stanza: That choice determines our destiny. What is clear is that the speaker is, at least, a person like Thomas in some respects though there may well be some of Frost in him also.

The major theme in Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken," is about making choices. The speaker in the poem in traveling and comes upon a cross roads or a fork-in-the-road. Robert Frost’s The Road Not Taken is a poem about the choices every person must make in their life.

The first line of show more content Though it would seem that Sonny’s life would be miserable compared to that of his brother, he is able to find happiness with his unusual lifestyle. Robert Frost’s ‘The Road Not The best loved of the American poets; Robert Frost () was born in USA.

He is considered “The Voice of America”.

The Road Not Taken Themes

Feb 17,  · In "The Road Not Taken," Frost does not indicate whether the road he chose was the right one. Nonetheless, that is the way he is going now, and the place he ends up, for better or worse, was the result of his elonghornsales.coms: 8.

The major theme in Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken," is about making choices. The speaker in the poem in traveling and comes upon a cross roads or a fork-in-the-road. Frost’s “The Road Not Taken”, the speaker emphasizes the idea of individuality as an attribute that is in his decision to “take the one less traveled by” (Frost 1).

Before the speaker makes his decision, he is given the choice to either “take the one less traveled by” (Frost 1), in where it.

The theme of individuality in the road not taken a poem by robert frost
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The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost - Poems | Academy of American Poets